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Northern Lights Parts & Accessories For Generators (Guide)

CitiMarine, one of South Florida’s premier marine service and sales outlets, recently shared these thoughts about Northern Lights quality:

Courtesy of CitimarineStore.com

Northern Lights Marine Generators range in output from 4.5 to 545 kW. Powered by Lugger diesel engines and popular in commercial fishing, yachting and passenger vessel applications, Northern Lights has come to be known for their quality and reliability when it comes to marine generators.

Elements of the Northern Lights generator that make it one of the most reliable, durable and simple to use power solutions on the market:

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Why Northern Lights Generators Beat The Competition

Courtesy of CitimarineStore.com

CitiMarine, one of South Florida’s premier marine service and sales outlets, recently shared these thoughts about Northern Lights quality:

Northern Lights Generators set the bar when it comes to marine generators.

If look up Northern Lights Generators on boating forums, such as The Hull Truth), you’ll see why Northern Lights is ahead of the pack.

Technicians who work on marine diesels and gensets for a living will tell you, Northern Lights are the best by far… simple and very well built.

Northern Lights generators have the best heavily dipped/insulated generator windings, as well as simple electrical wiring/engine harness/controls.

They are lower RPM engines (turn fewer RPMs than Onans or Westerbeke) leading to a longer-life and less problems.

We have received multiple reports of people using NL gensets season after season without so much as a hiccup, as well running the generators for 8,000 hours+ are common.

All that is needed is the occasional changing of oil and filters, and you’ll have a strong, dependable power-source on the waters that will never fail you.

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LR Foundation Launches Campaign to Identify Biggest Threats to Safety

The Lloyd’s Register Foundation aims to make a real difference in improving the safety of the critical infrastructure on which modern society relies. It recently launched a consultation to identify the grand challenges to safety at the Lloyd’s Register Foundation International Conference in London.

The consultation to identify the challenges will open today until January 2017, and asks industry, workers and consumers where is safety most compromised either from working with, or arising from poorly functioning infrastructure? Once it has identified these challenges it will ask ‘What can we do about them to make the world a safer place?’.

Dr. Ruth Boumphrey, the Foundation’s Director of Research, said: “Every day billions of people around the world need energy, water, food, transport and other services that make-up society’s critical infrastructure. These infrastructures and their supply chains rely on people to build, operate and maintain them. Our safety is threatened when these infrastructures fail and the safety of those who operate and maintain these infrastructures can be threatened by the environments in which they work .”

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Making The Right Choice for Onboard Comfort

It’s a story as old as manned sea-craft itself – how do you provide climate control that is suitable for the entire crew? Crew comfort is a key consideration for retention and regulation. Your crew works hard, but disputes about the amount of air conditioning or heating, and when and where to turn it on, have been inevitable.

The Marine Climate Control Experts at Technicold recommend individual compartment controls.  This will maximizes crew comfort while minimizing management headaches.

A world-class line of chilled water and direct-expansion air handlers will be designed to fit easily in almost any berth or compartment. When specking climate control, look for features including vertical assembly and rotatable insulated blowers.

There are other ways to enhance onboard comfort and safety. Electric heat strips and immersion heaters provide cold environment solutions. Install a dash heater in the pilot house to defrost the window, enhancing safety. Anti-bacterial UV lamps eliminate odors and improve air quality.

And if that still isn’t enough to keep the peace on board, look for locking control panels – just set it and forget it.

contoller locked

The experts at Technicold will help layout a complete climate control system through superior engineering and marine class components. For maximum onboard comfort the answer is simple: Technicold marine air conditioning.


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Technicold Condensing Coils – How a Small Detail Makes a Huge Impact

In the world of vessel design, climate control is an important factor. But one of the most critical factors in the quality of the air conditioning system is one that is easy to overlook – the condenser coil.

Many manufacturers use copper coils that are subject to failure from sitting coolant and corrosion. The Marine Climate Experts at Technicold have a better way.

condensor coil

Technicold uses only large, single pass fluted coaxial cupronickel counter-flow condensing coils.   That is a lot of features packed into a small component, so let’s break it down:

  • Large coil size ensures efficient coolant delivery.
  • The fluted design prevents sitting coolant and water that can lead to corrosion.
  • Cupornickel is a robust alloy that is known for its resistance to oxidation.
  • The counter flow condenser allows low sea water velocity for even condensing.

This level of attention is only one of many examples of the thoughtful engineering that goes into every Technicold product. Made specifically for the harsh marine environment, Technicold chilled water air conditioning systems feature 316L grade stainless steel hardware and low-condensation design to ensure the best long-term value in the marine industry.

The experts at Technicold will help layout a complete climate control system through superior engineering and marine class components. For maximum onboard comfort the answer is simple: Technicold marine air conditioning.


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Better Boating: How to Safely Run Ocean Inlets

Jim Hendricks
 (Source)

From the shifting Outer Banks of North Carolina to the tempestuous coast of the Pacific Northwest, boating anglers regularly face potentially hazardous inlets. Entrances such as those at Florida’s Boynton and St. Lucie inlets, Oregon’s Columbia River bar, California’s Golden Gate, and North Carolina’s Oregon Inlet host some of the world’s most challenging sea conditions.

A combination of ­factors can turn inlets nasty in a hurry, says Bill Cordes, director of sales and marketing for Opa Locka, Florida-based Invincible Boats. Cordes has run inlets all of his adult life, and witnessed breakers so tall you couldn’t see over the top.

“A powerful outgoing tide streaming through a narrow channel and a strong onshore wind tend to pile up steep seas,” Cordes explains. “Combine these two factors with shoaling, and you have big, breaking waves at the inlet, resulting in very ­dangerous conditions.”

Cordes and others offer the following tips for staying safe when running an inlet, with special advice for tackling entrances that are new to you.

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Don’t Be Left Out in The Cold – Electric Heat Solutions from Technicold

When it comes to on-board heating solutions you have a choice. Technicold – producers of the state of the art in marine climate control systems – recommends a safe, reliable electric heat solution. See below to learn more about the advantages electric heat enjoys over reverse cycle.

MV34_Stuart_FL

CONSIDER THE ENVIRONMENT

With a chilled water cooling system, both electric and reverse cycle systems are available to provide heat to your boat. However, there are many factors that go into choosing the right solution, including one that may not be obvious when considering the comfort of your interior – your exterior.

Electric heat is produced through your boat’s internal power source. Reverse cycle, however, is powered by a heat pump which transfers heat from one source to another. In the case of at an-sea environment, that external source is the ambient water.

Reverse heat has a limited range of operating conditions. Its ideal condition is in water that is 60o Fahrenheit. You may never encounter a problem with reverse heat if you can guarantee a water temperature of 60o – say, in the world’s largest bath tub!

Real world conditions, of course, are not that accommodating. Problems can manifest with reverse heat systems that are exposed to temperatures above 60o, or below 40o. Because there is not enough heat available in water temperatures below 40o, the reverse cycle system can short cycle on the low pressure switch. This leads to coil freezing and liquid slugging in the compressor. In extreme cold, the raw water condenser coil can even freeze and rupture. In other words, during the times when you need interior heating the most, reverse cycle heating is most vulnerable to failure.

Electric heat, on the other hand, is powered by the boat’s main AC source, and is therefore not subject to the variances of external temperature. The electric system design prevents the wear and tear on the compressors and raw water pump associated with the on and off cycling of a reverse heat system. Electric heat is also a much quieter option – there is no compressor or reversing valve noise as is present in a reverse heat system.

OPTIMAL VERSATILITY

Electric heat on chilled water systems is available through two different conveyances: immersion heat or heat strips. For immersion heat, a heat core is added to the condenser, which heats the entire loop. This is a good option for smaller boats, or scenarios where the entire boat must be kept at a consistent temperature. Heat and cooling is controlled through a single central control panel.

immersion-heater_1

Heat strips provide another heating option. Each air handler on a chilled water system can be equipped with its own heat strip, which can then be individually controlled by separate control panels. Each space on a boat can be temperature controlled as required. Heat strips are a good option for larger yachts and charter vessels. Grandma can turn up the heat in her berth, while the kids bouncing on the beds in their cabins remain cool.

2-stage immersion heater with flow switch2 b&w

DON’T BE LEFT HIGH AND DRY

Another scenario where electric heat is preferable is when the boat is out of the water. During refit or repair work – or even in winter storage – it is not possible to heat a dry boat with reverse heat. There is no seawater for the pumps to draw from. Because electric heat is provided by the boat’s AC power, it can be turned on at any time the generators are operating. Since most repair work is done in off-peak (winter) months, the work crew, engineers and anyone else on board will appreciate a heating option.

Your choice of climate control is important. Selecting a heating solution that is independent, versatile and efficient will provide long-term value and enhance your boating experience. Contact your nearest Technicold representative or visit our web site to learn more about the state of the art in marine heat, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration.

 


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TCSM – The Controller Tough Enough for the Commercial Marine Environment

As onboard power systems become more sophisticated, so the way that we interact with them must evolve. The commercial operator has a special challenge – finding controllers that are tough enough to withstand the marine environment, yet able to provide important data when you need it the most.

To address these needs, Northern Lights provides the TSCM “Tough Series” marine controller. With a backlit LCD screen and large, easy to read push buttons, TSCM is uniquely suited to the commercial operator’s engine room.

Currently available on Northern Lights commercial units up to 65kW, TSCM puts engine and electrical data at your fingertips. RS485 and J1939 protocols connect to a remote monitoring system. Because simplicity is always welcome in a commercial vessel, monitoring is available through a single data and power cable, up to 30 meters in length.

Northern Lights factory programs TSCM with pressure and temperature warnings and shutdowns to protect your power source. Other standard displays include battery voltage, run hours, operating status and an event log. Additional alarms and warnings can be added to meet your project’s specific needs.

Voltage and current monitoring is available on units 40kW and smaller. ECU codes are read on units from 50-65kW. All units can plug in with no additional adaptors required.

When you think Northern Lights you think simple durability. Our Tough Series of controllers make the industry’s best built products an even better value.


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