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Making The Right Choice for Onboard Comfort

It’s a story as old as manned sea-craft itself – how do you provide climate control that is suitable for the entire crew? Crew comfort is a key consideration for retention and regulation. Your crew works hard, but disputes about the amount of air conditioning or heating, and when and where to turn it on, have been inevitable.

The Marine Climate Control Experts at Technicold recommend individual compartment controls.  This will maximizes crew comfort while minimizing management headaches.

A world-class line of chilled water and direct-expansion air handlers will be designed to fit easily in almost any berth or compartment. When specking climate control, look for features including vertical assembly and rotatable insulated blowers.

There are other ways to enhance onboard comfort and safety. Electric heat strips and immersion heaters provide cold environment solutions. Install a dash heater in the pilot house to defrost the window, enhancing safety. Anti-bacterial UV lamps eliminate odors and improve air quality.

And if that still isn’t enough to keep the peace on board, look for locking control panels – just set it and forget it.

contoller locked

The experts at Technicold will help layout a complete climate control system through superior engineering and marine class components. For maximum onboard comfort the answer is simple: Technicold marine air conditioning.


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TSCM – the Controller Tough Enough for the Sportfish Market

As onboard power systems become more sophisticated, so the way that we interact with them must evolve. The sport fisherman has a unique challenge – finding controllers that are tough enough to withstand the marine environment, yet able to provide important data when you need it the most.

 

To address these needs, Northern Lights provides the TSCM “Tough Series” marine controller. With a backlit LCD screen and large, easy to read push buttons, TSCM is uniquely suited to the commercial operator’s engine room.

TSC

Currently available on Northern Lights marine generator sets from 5-40kW, TSCM puts engine and electrical data at your fingertips. RS485 and J1939 protocols connect to a remote monitoring system. Because simplicity is always welcome onboard a battlewagon, monitoring is available through a single data and power cable, up to 30 meters in length.

Northern Lights factory programs TSCM with pressure and temperature warnings and shutdowns to protect your power source. Other standard displays include battery voltage, run hours, operating status and an event log. Additional alarms and warnings can be added to meet your project’s specific needs.  Voltage and current monitoring is also available. Units can plug in with no additional adaptors required.

When you think Northern Lights you think simple durability. Our Tough Series of controllers make the industry’s best built products an even better value.


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Ten Commandments of Troubleshooting On Board Marine Systems

Maybe you’ve been there.  Maybe it’s a client meeting, or a well-deserved vacation.  You’ve planned your trip for months.  And sure enough, right before it is time to splash, a problem with one of your on-board systems jeopardizes the whole event.

There is no shortage of online opinions when it comes to vessel maintenance and repair.  Some of it is, simply put, terrible advice from questionable sources. At Northern Lights and Technicold we are lucky to work alongside some insanely smart people with a tremendous amount of technical knowledge. We make it a point to locate and highlight the information we think is valuable and relevant so that we can share it with you. We spotted this article in Power and Motoryacht on the 10 Commandments of Troubleshooting and saw great value in the advice given.

Why we like it: This article doesn’t troubleshoot a particular problem or piece of equipment. Rather, it outlines “the art of troubleshooting” and provides some great advice on how to approach problems as a whole.

We found the following highlights particularly valuable:

-If you feel like you need to employ a hammer, take a deep breath and reconsider.

-Work performed quickly is often work that will have to be performed again.

-Start small and work up from there.

See Capt. Richard Theil’s full article on the PMY website http://www.powerandmotoryacht.com/engine/troubleshooting-your-boats-engine


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