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Why Northern Lights Generators Beat The Competition

Courtesy of CitimarineStore.com

CitiMarine, one of South Florida’s premier marine service and sales outlets, recently shared these thoughts about Northern Lights quality:

Northern Lights Generators set the bar when it comes to marine generators.

If look up Northern Lights Generators on boating forums, such as The Hull Truth), you’ll see why Northern Lights is ahead of the pack.

Technicians who work on marine diesels and gensets for a living will tell you, Northern Lights are the best by far… simple and very well built.

Northern Lights generators have the best heavily dipped/insulated generator windings, as well as simple electrical wiring/engine harness/controls.

They are lower RPM engines (turn fewer RPMs than Onans or Westerbeke) leading to a longer-life and less problems.

We have received multiple reports of people using NL gensets season after season without so much as a hiccup, as well running the generators for 8,000 hours+ are common.

All that is needed is the occasional changing of oil and filters, and you’ll have a strong, dependable power-source on the waters that will never fail you.

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MARAD Awards $4.9 Million in Small Shipyard Grants

The U.S. Maritime Administration has awarded $4.9 million in grants to support capital improvements at nine small shipyards located throughout the United States.

Made under the Small Shipyard Grant Program the grants will fund a variety of projects including infrastructure improvements and equipment upgrades to increase operational competitiveness and quality vessel construction.

“U.S. shipyards produce what are unquestionably some of the best built vessels in the world,” said Maritime Administrator Paul “Chip” Jaenichen. “The grants awarded today will help ensure that ‘Built in America’ remains an international shipbuilding standard.”

In order to qualify for the grants, the shipyards had to meet a number of eligibility requirements. Eligible shipyards must be in a single geographical location, located in or near a maritime community, and may not have more than 1200 production employees. The shipyard facility must repair, construct, repair or reconfigure vessels 40 feet in length or greater for commercial or government use; or reconfigure vessels 100 feet in length or greater for non-commercial vessels.

The requirements for project eligibility include capital improvement projects that foster efficiency, competitive operation and quality construction, repair and reconfiguration. Also considered are training projects that foster employee skills and enhancing productivity in communities whose economies are related to or dependent upon the maritime industry.

Of the 118 grant application received, these nine yards received awards:

  • Gravios Aluminum Boats, LLC of Jeanerette, LA for a big top portable shelter and transporter
  • Chesapeake Shipbuilding of Salisbury, MD for a mobile rough terrain crane and infrastructure improvements
  • Eastern Shipbuilding Group of Panama City, FL for a precision cutting system
  • Marine Group Boat Works of Chula Vista, CA for a gantry crane and metal working equipment
  • Diversified Marine of Portland, OR for boom lifts, scissor lifts and welding equipment
  • Conrad Orange Shipyard of Orange, TX for LNG tank building equipment and pipe welding equipment
  • Yank Marine of Dorchester, NJ for a 70-ton rough terrain crane
  • Yager Marine of Owensboro, KY for a 1,200-ton dry dock
  • American Shipyard Company, LLC of Newport, RI for a 200-ton travelift

As a US-based manufacture of industry-best commercial solutions, Northern Lights congratulates all of the grant recipients.


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The Ten Commandments of Troubleshooting in Your Commercial Vessel

Despite the cliche’, time is not literally money.  However, when a vessel is out-of-service it wastes both.  Getting a problem solved efficiently minimizes down time and gets you back to work.

There is no shortage of online opinions when it comes to vessel maintenance and repair.  Some of it is, simply put, terrible advice from questionable sources. At Northern Lights and Technicold we are lucky to work alongside some insanely smart people with a tremendous amount of technical knowledge. We make it a point to locate and highlight the information we think is valuable and relevant so that we can share it with you. We spotted this article in Power and Motoryacht on the 10 Commandments of Troubleshooting and saw great value in the advice given.

Why we like it: This article doesn’t troubleshoot a particular problem or piece of equipment. Rather, it outlines “the art of troubleshooting” and provides some great advice on how to approach problems as a whole.

We found the following highlights particularly valuable:

-If you feel like you need to employ a hammer, take a deep breath and reconsider.

-Work performed quickly is often work that will have to be performed again.

-Start small and work up from there.

See Capt. Richard Theil’s full article on the PMY website http://www.powerandmotoryacht.com/engine/troubleshooting-your-boats-engine


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Ten Commandments of Troubleshooting On Board Marine Systems

Maybe you’ve been there.  Maybe it’s a client meeting, or a well-deserved vacation.  You’ve planned your trip for months.  And sure enough, right before it is time to splash, a problem with one of your on-board systems jeopardizes the whole event.

There is no shortage of online opinions when it comes to vessel maintenance and repair.  Some of it is, simply put, terrible advice from questionable sources. At Northern Lights and Technicold we are lucky to work alongside some insanely smart people with a tremendous amount of technical knowledge. We make it a point to locate and highlight the information we think is valuable and relevant so that we can share it with you. We spotted this article in Power and Motoryacht on the 10 Commandments of Troubleshooting and saw great value in the advice given.

Why we like it: This article doesn’t troubleshoot a particular problem or piece of equipment. Rather, it outlines “the art of troubleshooting” and provides some great advice on how to approach problems as a whole.

We found the following highlights particularly valuable:

-If you feel like you need to employ a hammer, take a deep breath and reconsider.

-Work performed quickly is often work that will have to be performed again.

-Start small and work up from there.

See Capt. Richard Theil’s full article on the PMY website http://www.powerandmotoryacht.com/engine/troubleshooting-your-boats-engine


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